• « Ma carrière personnelle colle assez bien au modèle généraliste... Ma passion pour les ordinateurs a toujours été mélangée à beaucoup d'autres centres d'intérêts. » Bill Gates.

    De « la règle des 10 000 heures » au modèle des parents tigres qui poussent et pressent les enfants à la réussite scolaire, on vous a enseigné que le succès dans tous les domaines passe par une spécialisation précoce et une pratique intensive. Et pire, que si vous ne vous investissiez pas à temps, vous ne rattraperiez jamais votre retard sur ceux qui ont commencé tôt. C'est totalement faux. Dans ce livre, David Epstein démontre que la voie du succès est simple : obtenir un peu d'expérience, dans un domaine puis un autre, faire des détours, expérimenter sans cesse, jongler avec plusieurs centres d'intérêts, et développer ainsi votre généralité . Epstein a étudié la carrière des plus grands athlètes comme Roger Federer, artistes, musiciens, inventeurs et scientifiques, il nous révèle pourquoi dans ces domaines complexes, les généralistes réussissent mieux que les spécialistes. Peu importe ce que vous faites, où vous en êtes, que vous soyez étudiant, scientifique, businessman, parent, retraité, vous verrez le monde différemment après ce livre. Vous comprendrez plus facilement comment on résout les problèmes, comment on apprend et réussit. Vous verrez les échecs comme le meilleur test pour progresser et pourquoi la plupart des « déserteurs » finissent par faire une carrière brillante. Range montre que les personnes qui ont une grande ouverture d'esprit et s'investissent dans diverses expériences et perspectives s'épanouissent et pourquoi élargir vos connaissances à différents domaines est la clé de votre succès.
    Élu livre de l'année 2020 par le cabinet de conseil Mc Kinsey

  • The instant Sunday Times Top Ten and New York Times bestseller SHORTLISTED FOR THE FINANCIAL TIMES/MCKINSEY BUSINESS BOOK OF THE YEAR AWARD 2019 A Financial Times Essential Reads of 2019 pick 'I loved Range ' - Malcolm Gladwell 'Urgent and important. . . an essential read for bosses, parents, coaches, and anyone who cares about improving performance.' - Daniel H. Pink 'So much crucial and revelatory information about performance, success, and education.' - Susan Cain, bestselling author of Quiet A powerful argument for how to succeed in any field: develop broad interests and skills while everyone around you is rushing to specialize. From the '10,000 hours rule' to the power of Tiger parenting, we have been taught that success in any field requires early specialization and many hours of deliberate practice. And, worse, that if you dabble or delay, you'll never catch up with those who got a head start. This is completely wrong. In this landmark book, David Epstein shows you that the way to succeed is by sampling widely, gaining a breadth of experiences, taking detours, experimenting relentlessly, juggling many interests - in other words, by developing range . Studying the world's most successful athletes, artists, musicians, inventors and scientists, Epstein demonstrates why in most fields - especially those that are complex and unpredictable - generalists, not specialists are primed to excel. No matter what you do, where you are in life, whether you are a teacher, student, scientist, business analyst, parent, job hunter, retiree, you will see the world differently after you've read Range . You'll understand better how we solve problems, how we learn and how we succeed. You'll see why failing a test is the best way to learn and why frequent quitters end up with the most fulfilling careers. As experts silo themselves further while computers master more of the skills once reserved for highly focused humans, Range shows how people who think broadly and embrace diverse experiences and perspectives will increasingly thrive and why spreading your knowledge across multiple domains is the key to your success, and how to achieve it.

  • The #1 New York Times bestseller that has all America talking: as seen/heard on Morning Joe, CBS This Morning, The Bill Simmons Podcast, and more. A powerful argument for how to succeed in any field: develop broad interests and skills while everyone around you is rushing to specialize. The most important business--and parenting--book of the year. -- Forbes Urgent and important. . . an essential read for bosses, parents, coaches, and anyone who cares about improving performance. --Daniel H. Pink So much crucial and revelatory information about performance, success, and education. --Susan Cain, bestselling author of Quiet As David Epstein shows us, cultivating range prepares us for the wickedly unanticipated a well-supported and smoothly written case on behalf of breadth and late starts. -- Wall Street Journal Plenty of experts argue that anyone who wants to develop a skill, play an instrument, or lead their field should start early, focus intensely, and rack up as many hours of deliberate practice as possible. If you dabble or delay, youll never catch up to the people who got a head start. But a closer look at research on the worlds top performers, from professional athletes to Nobel laureates, shows that early specialization is the exception, not the rule. David Epstein examined the worlds most successful athletes, artists, musicians, inventors, forecasters and scientists. He discovered that in most fields--especially those that are complex and unpredictable--generalists, not specialists, are primed to excel. Generalists often find their path late, and they juggle many interests rather than focusing on one. Theyre also more creative, more agile, and able to make connections their more specialized peers cant see. Provocative, rigorous, and engrossing, Range makes a compelling case for actively cultivating inefficiency. Failing a test is the best way to learn. Frequent quitters end up with the most fulfilling careers. The most impactful inventors cross domains rather than deepening their knowledge in a single area. As experts silo themselves further while computers master more of the skills once reserved for highly focused humans, people who think broadly and embrace diverse experiences and perspectives will increasingly thrive.

  • Le gène du sport

    David Epstein

    Nous avons tous connu un athlète exceptionnel au lycée. Celui pour qui tout semblait facile. Il était capitaine ou défenseur; elle était leader de l'équipe de basket et douée au saut en hauteur. Etait-ce dû à leur nature ? Ce débat est aussi vieux que l'histoire de la compétition sportive. Est-ce que des athlètes comme Usain Bolt, Michael Phelps ou Serena Williams dominent leur discipline en raison d'un patrimoine génétique extraordinaire?

  • RANGE

    David Epstein

    B>The instant/b> b>Sunday Times/b> b>Top Ten /b>b>and New York Times bestseller/b>b>SHORTLISTED FOR THE FINANCIAL TIMES/MCKINSEY BUSINESS BOOK OF THE YEAR AWARD 2019/b>b>A Financial Times Essential Reads of 2019 pick/b>br>b>/b>br>b>/b>'I b>loved /b>Range' Malcolm Gladwell'It's a joy to spend hours in the company of b>a/b> b>writer as gifted as David Epstein/b>' Susan Cain, bestselling author of Quiet'A goldmine of surprising insights. b>Makes you smarter with every page/b>' James Clear, bestselling author of Atomic Habits'b>Urgent and important/b>. . . an essential read for bosses, parents, coaches, and anyone who cares about improving performance' Daniel H. Pinkb>A powerful argument for how to succeed in any field: develop broad interests and skills while everyone around you is rushing to specialize./b> From the '10,000 hours rule' to the power of Tiger parenting, we have been taught that success in any field requires early specialization and many hours of deliberate practice. And, worse, that if you dabble or delay, you'll never catch up with those who got a head start. This is completely wrong.In this landmark book, David Epstein shows you that the way to succeed is by sampling widely, gaining a breadth of experiences, taking detours, experimenting relentlessly, juggling many interests - in other words, by developing range.Studying the world's most successful athletes, artists, musicians, inventors and scientists, Epstein demonstrates why in most fields - especially those that are complex and unpredictable - generalists, not specialists are primed to excel. No matter what you do, where you are in life, whether you are a teacher, student, scientist, business analyst, parent, job hunter, retiree, you will see the world differently after you've read Range. You'll understand better how we solve problems, how we learn and how we succeed. You'll see why failing a test is the best way to learn and why frequent quitters end up with the most fulfilling careers. As experts silo themselves further while computers master more of the skills once reserved for highly focused humans, Range shows how people who think broadly and embrace diverse experiences and perspectives will increasingly thrive and why spreading your knowledge across multiple domains is the key to your success, and how to achieve it.

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